Effects of Cognitive Leisure Activity on Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document

JAMDA Journal

2017-04-07

Effects of Cognitive Leisure Activity on Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment

This article documents a Japanese study on the effects of engaging in dance activities, or playing musical instruments, in individuals displaying symptoms of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Their overall conclusion: “Long-term cognitive leisure activity programs involving dance or playing musical instruments resulted in improvements in memory and general cognitive function”.

https://campuschildcare-old.wm.edu/thinking/my-holiday-plans-essay/10/ viagra generika testpackung https://greenechamber.org/blog/effective-communication-case-study/74/ argumentative essay on junk food in schools que pasa si tomo mucho levitra https://harvestinghappiness.com/drug/easy-on-line-viagra/66/ custom mba admission paper topics mla format for papers heading mla citation example in essay can you use i in a research paper buy 50 mg viagra online cialis bonneau follow link essay buying viagra over the counter in canada 400 word essay on respect paper writers college homework help chat rooms viagra super active viagra discount code enter site how to get into creative writingВ example of essay mla thesis sentence vs topic sentence by shmoop here computer technology essay sample click how to write datatable to xml file in vb net writing practice essay viagra mission viagra effects dosage top rhetorical analysis essay writers service for phd Objective: To test the hypothesis that a long-term, structured cognitive leisure activity program is more effective than a health education program at reducing the risk of further cognitive decline in older adults with mild cognitive impairment syndrome (MCI), a high risk for dementia.

Design: A 3-arm, single-blind randomized controlled trial.

Setting: Community.

Participants: A total of 201 Japanese adults with MCI (mean age: 76.0 years, 52% women).

Interventions: Participants were randomized into 1 of 2 cognitive leisure activity programs (60 minutes weekly for 40 weeks): dance (n = 67) and playing musical instruments (n = 67), or a health education control group (n = 67).

Measurements: Primary outcomes were memory function changes at 40 weeks. Secondary outcomes included changes in Mini-Mental State Examination and nonmemory domain (Trail Making Tests A and B) scores.

Results: At 40 weeks, the dance group showed improved memory recall scores compared with controls [mean change (SD): dance group 0.73 (1.9) vs controls 0.01 (1.9); P = .011], whereas the music group did not show an improvement compared with controls (P = .123). Both dance [mean change (SD): 0.29 (2.6); P = .026] and music groups [mean change (SD): 0.46 (2.1); P = .008] showed improved MiniMental State Examination scores compared with controls [mean change (SD): −0.36 (2.3)]. No difference in the nonmemory cognitive tests was observed.

Conclusions: Long-term cognitive leisure activity programs involving dance or playing musical instruments resulted in improvements in memory and general cognitive function compared with a health education program in older adults with MCI.