Sets In Order Archive

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document

Bob Osgood

1948-1985

SIO Archive Page

Click on the link to view a page pointing to digitized copies of complete editions of the Sets In Order magazine.

This page is a tribute to Bob and Becky Osgood. The Sets In Order magazines are one of their legacys that comprise in these pages the history of modern square dancing. Bob began publishing SIO in 1948 and the last issue was issued in December 1985, 444 issues.

This material is Copyright (C) by Bob Osgood, and his heirs and may not be reproduced in any form including digital transmission for commercial purposes. Short articles may be reprinted using credit: “Reprinted from [magazine] and magazine year and month. magazine should be replaced by the appropriate magazine name such as SQUARE DANCING Magazine, official magazine of The Sets in Order American Square Dance Society” or just “Sets In Order” for earlier issues. Please credit by-lined authors.


As I Saw It – Bob Osgood (book)

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document

Paul Moore (paulmoore@wildblue.net)

2017-02-05

Purchase At Amazon

This book was compiled and edited by Paul Moore. It describes the life and career of Bob Osgood, one of the founding fathers of MWSD and through that lens provides an enlightening vantage point on the evolution and growth of the square dance activity. Much of it is in Bob’s own words, taken from his own articles, notes, and recordings. A remarkable insight into a remarkable man.

Document Abstract

This is the story of Bob Osgood from his early years in New York City to his passing in Beverly Hills, CA. We get a picture of the Los Angeles area from a child’s perspective during the Depression. More importantly we see Bob discover square dancing in a small country general store in Northern Arizona and the effect that experience had on him. Later Bob was reintroduced to square dancing at a leadership conference held at the beautiful conference ground at Asilomor, near Monterey, California. These two experiences changed Bob permanently, and then he went on the change square dancing. He studied under Dr. Lloyd ‘Pappy” Shaw who inspired Bob to teach some of the first classes in the Los Angeles area. In the post WWII era, Bob started a square dance magazine, Sets in Order, which was the most widely read square dance magazine in the world. And Bob took square dancing worldwide with a series of tours to all parts of the world. Bob saw first hand the effect square dancing had on the military returning from the war and how square dancing had a profound effect on America. When the square dance activity became widespread, Bob saw the need to have callers use the same terminology when calling. Bob was the drive behind the formation of CALLERLAB, The International Association of Square Dance Callers. This book gives all readers a chance to meet a charismatic man who was dedicated to helping people have fun.


Using Hearing Assist System To Slave One Amp To Another

Article Type Submitter Date Links Description
Idea Wayne Weston (wtweston@satx.rr.com )

2017-04-08

Handout PDF

This handout from the CDLS session at the 2017 CALLERLAB convention explains how to slave one sound system to another using a hearing assist system. This avoids having to string long cables when sounding large rooms.


List of Sound Equipment For Square Dancing (CDLS 2017)

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document

Bob Riggs (Bob@SDE-Co.com)

2017-04-08

Equipment List PDF

This 2-page document lists some of the commonly used sound equipment used for square dancing and where it may be obtained. It is a handout from a presentation at the Community Dance Leaders Seminar (CDLS) at the 2017 CALLERLAB convention.


Step By Step Through Modern Square Dance History (book)

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document

Jim Mayo (jmayo329@aol.com)

2003-12-02

Purchase On Amazon

This book traces the development of Modern Western Square Dancing from its earliest origins through to the present day. Understanding the evolution of our activity can shed valuable insights for dealing with today’s issues.


Managing Dances With SqView

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Barry Johnson (callerbear@gmail.com) 2010-04-01 Managing Dances with SqView PDF

This 27 page PDF document describes in detail how to install and use the SqView music management program on a laptop computer.

Document Abstract

Callers and cuers using laptop computers for their music will need to use some piece of software to play their music. There are a wide variety of choices for this software, and generally any will be sufficient for simply playing music. However, most dance leaders prefer to use software specifically designed for square and round dance leaders. One particular software program, SqView (pronounced “Square View”) has been growing in popularity, and is used by an estimated 75% of callers using computers. This paper discusses SqView – how to get it, how to use it, and how to fix some common problems you may encounter with the program.


CALLERLAB Program Documents

Article Type Author Last Update Description
Summary Barry Clasper (barry@clasper.ca) 2017-08-20

This summary points to the primary program-related documents that have been officially published by CALLERLAB. This includes program lists, call definitions, timing charts, lesson checklists, teaching tips, and other materials. Click on the appropriate button below to see a list of materials for the program indicated. Click on the name of the document to access it.

Program Document Tables (click to view)

Document Name Revision Date
Advanced List 2016-12-21
Advanced Definitions 2017-02-22
A1 Checklist 2016-12-21
A2 Checklist 2012-09-13
Advanced Timing Chart 2015-12-15
What Is Advanced Dancing Booklet ????

Document Name Revision Date
C1 List 2016-09-26
C1 Definitions 2017-03-19
C2 List 2016-12-21
C2 Definitions 2016-12-21
C3A List 2017-07-22
C3A Definitions 2017-07-18
Challenge Teaching Orders 2012-02-10


Nuts And Bolts (book)

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Kip Garvey (kip@kipgarvey.com) 5 March, 2017 Book

This 190 page book by one of the legendary figures in MWSD presents an analysis of choreographic structure for modern western square dance callers and dancers. With over 50 years experience as a professional square dance caller, Kip presents the principles of calling current day square dance for readers interested in understanding underlying concepts and technique with emphasis on the technical aspects of choreography. This deep dive into choreographic theory is loaded with graphic illustrations and many Getout, Conversion and Transition call modules. It is a text that should be in every caller’s library.

Click on the “Book” link to the left to see more information and purchase online.


Standard Contract for a Calling Date

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document CALLERLAB 24 May 2009 Contract PDF

This PDF file contains a boilerplate standard contract you can use when arranging a calling date.


Stages Document from Women In Calling Committee

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Women In Calling Committee of CALLERLAB, Deborah Carroll-Jones Chairperson July, 2008 “Stages” Document

This document was produced by the Women In Calling Committee to assist and inform women callers regarding issues that are unique to women callers.


Why We Should Care About On-Line Marketing

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Claudia Littlefair (claudia.littlefair@gmail.com) 2016-10-12 On-Line Marketing

This an article extracted from the October 2016 edition of the Alberta Chatter newsletter edited by Claudia Littlefair. In the article Claudia examines the typical strategies various age groups use when shopping or looking for information, and how we can use that understanding to reach potential dancers.


Health Benefits Article Posted by Ontario Square & Round Dance Federation

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Ontario Square and Round Dance Federation February 4, 2016 Webpage

This article was posted on their website by the Ontario Square and Round Dance Federation. It discusses the health benefits of square dancing and also contains links to other materials dealing with the topic.


Recruitment

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Tim Marriner 2016 Document PDF

Some ideas from Tim Marriner on the subject of recruiting new dancers to a club.

One of the most important necessities of our activity today is the need to find prospective new dancers. Unfortunately, many current dancers have grown weary looking for new people for various reasons. Existing dancers often have hounded their neighbors and friends several times to the point of being a nuisance. There are also dancers that would prefer not to have to “angel” anyone else again, possibly due to burn out. Some members might not really want to lower their proficiency or may wish to move ahead to other forms or programs of dance, not really interested in recruitment of new dancers. If a club determines they need to host new dancer sessions, the entire club needs to understand their responsibilities to support the effort 100%. Recruitment should not be left in just the hands of the caller or the club officers.



New Dancer Coordinator

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Tim Marriner 2016 Document PDF

Does you club have an officer who has the job of organizing and catering to your new dancers? If not, you should think about it. This document describes what the responsibilities of a New Dancer Coordinator would be.

After the Club President the New Dancer Coordinator (NDC) is the next most important officer of a square dance club. They must coordinate between the Club President and the club instructor many necessary duties to achieve success. Without new dancers clubs are destined to fail. New dancers are the lifeblood of our activity. New dancers usually have friends nobody has ever contacted to join the square dance activity. They are often highly motivated and willing to encourage others to join something they find new and exciting. The main objective of the NDC is to provide the best fun filled learning experience possible. The NDC must also work year round to energize the club to recruit prospective new dancers, not just one month prior to a new dancer session. The task is very rewarding when everything comes together and you are able to achieve club growth.



Health Plan Newsletter Extols Square Dancing

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document SCAN Newsletter January, 2016 SCAN Club Newsletter Article Jan2016

SCAN is a health plan that publishes a newsletter for its members. The January 2016 edition contained an article talking about the benefits of square dancing for physical, social, and cognitive health. Considering the natural interest a medical plan has in promoting the overall good health of its members, this represents a strong endorsement.


Signs Speak Volumes

Article Type Submitter Date Links Description
Idea

Document

Claudia Littlefair November, 2015 Albert Chatter Newsletter Nov 2015, pages 1-2

This article abstracted from the November 2015 edition of the Alberta Chatter newsletter describes how a club uses innovative signage as an aid to recruiting new dancers. See the article titled “Signs Speak Volumes”.


Controlling Choreography With Relationships

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Barry Johnson (callerbear@gmail.com) 2014 Controlling Choreography With Relationships (PDF File)

This 78 page document is a detailed description of how callers can use dancer relationships as a tool for resolving squares. See the document abstract below for additional details.

From a choreographic point of view,callers describe the position of the dancers in a square by using four descriptive attributes: Formation, Arrangement, Sequence and Relationships.

  • Formation describes the spots on the floor in which dancers are standing,
  • Arrangement describes the way dancing genders are standing relative to one another,
  • Sequence describes whether or not dancers are in the original squared set order, and
  • Relationship describes which men and which women are near one another.

Together, these four attributes can be used to precisely define the choreographic state of a square, and a specific combination of these four values is called a “FASR” (pronounced “fah-zer”).

For decades, many callers have focused on Formation, Arrangement and Sequence while tracking dancers as they move through a sequence. Although formation and arrangement are fairly easy to see, sequence is not — especially “on the fly” since many calls will change the sequence of some or all dancers. There are specific techniques that can be used to resolve a square using just formation, arrangement and sequence, but these techniques may require several steps to reach the final desired result. The complexity of those techniques leads many callers to “hunt for corners”, trying one call after another until the dancers fall into a recognizable FASR.

With this focus on Formation, Arrangement and Sequence the fourth leg of the nomenclature system, Relationship, has generally been ignored.

But it turns out that the relationships of the dancers can actually be easier for many callers to understand and see while a square is in motion, and the principles of using relationships while calling can be learned in just a few minutes. Once relationships are recognizable, the state of the square is easily identified in almost any FASR at all. A few simple “cookbook” rules allow a caller to consciously change the relationships at will, giving the caller a great deal of control over the state of the square.

There are three main ways that callers can use relationships:

  • Finding their way out when they’re lost: being able to recognize the state of the square, then regaining control by consciously changing stations;
  • As a framework within which modules and desired choreographic sequences can be used. Put the dancers into a known station, dance them around as desired while preserving the station (or consciously changing it to a different one), and finally resolve without question because you know exactly where the dancers are.
  • As a launching pad for using memorized get-outs from many different starting positions.

We’ll discuss each of these areas in the pages that follow.

Relationships and CRaMS
For the last several years, some callers have been advocating a larger calling system named CRaMS, the “Controlled Relationship and Manipulation System.” Readers that are familiar with CRaMS will recognize much of the material in this book. CRaMS uses relationship choreographic control as just one of several tools and techniques to achieve the broader goal of helping callers to improve upon their craft. We’ll talk more about the larger system of CRaMS in Chapters 7 and 17.

Relationships and Mental Image
Astute readers may also notice several similarities to Don Beck’s Mental Image system, particularly in the way that calls are classified based on the way they affect the setup of the square. Both systems (Relationships and Mental Image) rely on the symmetries of the square as calls are executed — and therefore are likely to resemble one another, even while coming at the problem from very different directions and using completely different vocabularies.



Advertising Brochure Stressing Health Benefits

Article Type Submitter Date Links Description
Idea Jean Lander (hjlander@gmail.com) April 2015

2015-04-20 Ottonobee Brochure re Health Benefits (pdf file)

2015-04-20 Ottonobee Brochure re Health Benefits (docx file)

It is a different approach. I am stressing the health benefits of square dancing. The idea is we will get these rack cards professionally printed. We will buy the plastic rack holders and then our members will approach doctors offices, medical centres, activity centres, health food stores, or anywhere they can find that is suitable for our display there. Hopefully one person/couple will take responsibility of one or two holders, finding a location and keeping it stocked.

I have had positive feedback from Lift Lock, Otonabee, Lindsay and Cobourg. Cobourg is waiting for a meeting to get approval. The clubs will pay for as many cards are they want.

There will be no specific locations, times, etc., on the card, as you can see.

I have had 3 quotes for printing 5000. The best price is $600 which includes tax. Holders are approx. 1.50per piece. The cards are about 3.5″ x 8″. The shelf life of the cards is long term as no dates, times etc., are given.


Dancing Makes You Smarter

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Richard Powers 2015

Condensed Article From SRDIAA Sep 2015 Newsletter

Full Article

Full Study In New England Journal of Medicine

This article by Richard Powers discusses the findings of a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2003 which found that dancing offers protection against dementia. Square dancing is not specifically singled out, but the information presented seems to indicate that it would provide one of the highest degrees of protection. In September 2015 the Square and Round Dance Instructors Association of Alberta (SRDIAA) published a condensed version of Richard Powers’s article in its newsletter. The condensed article provides pointers both to the full Richard Power article and the subject NEJM study. Those pointers are also provided here.

Richard Powers is a full-time instructor in contemporary social dancing and dance history, Stanford University Dance Division, Department of Theater and Performance Studies. (Full bio)


Multi-Cycle Program X Plan from Gardner Patton

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document

Idea

Gardner Patton (gcp6@optonline.net) 2012 Webpage

If you read any of the square dance publications today you will note that many articles suggest the way to attract more people into the square dance activity is to provide a square dance Program which: 1) takes a short time to learn; 2) provides dances where a person can dance that Program frequently. The thought is, that if you can teach dancers enough quickly to where they can dance frequently knowing a few calls, they will spread their enthusiasm for the activity to their friends who can start dancing almost immediately without waiting a year for the next cycle to start.

In the past there have been plans that provide for a Program with less calls (ABC, Community Dance Program, Basic 1, etc.) with little thought to moving those folks who dance that Program forward. There have also been multi-cycle plans which have short periods between new class starts but they have not included a way for people who want to, to dance frequently to a Program lower than Mainstream.

The plan described here is a combination of the best parts of those two plans, and shows that if it is implemented in a region where there are multiple clubs, who all follow the plan, a new dance Program can be introduced into the region which has fewer calls thus creating a pool of dancers from which new Mainstream dancers will eventually emerge.


Alternate Lessons Systems Brochure

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Arnold Gladson (agladson@austin.rr.com) 2001 Brochure

This brochure was produced by a CALLERLAB Ad Hoc committee. It explains and contrasts traditional lesson structures with multi-cycle and accelerated programs.


All About Modules (book)

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document

Resource

Cal Campbell (cal@eazy.net) 2014 Book

This book covers all the bases starting with the new caller just learning how to call and on through the old hands looking for ways to expand their collection of modules and to learn new tricks on how to use square dance modules to improve their calling skills. It’s all there.

The new caller will find a comprehensive set of lessons to introduce them to the art of using modules to call square dances. You will be guided step by step through a learning process that will enable you to quickly select and memorize modules and then call them at a dance and be successful. It is a time proven successful way to learn how to call and to entertain square dancers. However, It’s not a magic. You will have to practice and you will have to study choreography.


Teaching New Dancers (eBook)

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Cal Campbell (calcampbl@gmail.com) 2015 eBook

Designed for Elementary and Secondary School Teachers.

The 18 dances featured in this short book use only four basics. Circle Right/Left, Forward & Back, Arm Turns, Star Right/Left. These four basics are used in big circles, line dances, contra dance, square dances, trios, and mixers. This enables the teacher to teach only four dance movement and then to use these same movements in various ways to provide a great deal of variety in dances.


Out Of Sight (book)

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Don Beck 2014 Book

Out of Sight is a book that teaches square dance callers how to manage choreography using a mental image system. Other common choreographic methods are reading, modules, and sight calling. Mental image calling allows a caller to create choreography on the fly, while calling, and then easily resolve the square. Unlike reading or modules, the choreography need not be pre-written, and allows the caller much more flexibility to improvise. Unlike sight calling, the caller does not have to memorize who started with whom, each tip, and s/he is not dependent on whether the dancers made any mistakes. This method does not require that a caller learn how to follow eight or even only four dancers, but basically only one dancer as s/he moves around the square.

The Second Printing is now available. It includes an additional 15 pages in the form of a Forward to the Second Printing, an Afterword, and an additional Appendix. There is additional advanced information about the system available on the authors website for callers who have fully learned the system as taught in the book.


2017 Caller Schools

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document CALLERLAB Home Office 2017-03-15 List of 2017 Schools

This document contains a listing of Caller Schools sponsored and staffed by CALLERLAB members for 2017. This listing is provided as a service to CALLERLAB members for information. This listing does not constitute endorsement of the listed schools in preference to any that may not be listed. Only schools that are reported to us are listed. For further information, please contact the school of your choice.


Caller Mentoring Guidelines

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document CALLERLAB Caller Training Committee (callertraining@callerlab.org) 2013-01-06 Full Document

This document was prepared by the Caller Training Committee to assist those callers who are mentoring newer callers. (See document abstract below)

If you are thinking of becoming a Mentor for a new caller, this booklet is designed to help a more experienced caller to work with a new caller. If a friend wants to learn to call, the experienced caller can just give them a record and help them learn a singing call. However, callers know that there is more to calling than memorizing a singing call. If the experienced caller wants to really help, they need to become a Mentor. This booklet will provide ideas for being a Mentor to a new caller. The committee expects that the Mentor will work with the student caller for a period of time that can be up to two years. The new caller would become more independent over that time, but could consult with the Mentor when needed.

A potential caller may get started by trying a singing call at an amateur night, by teaching square dancing in combination with called recordings, or by developing an interest in choreography. Most often the new/potential caller sings a singing call at a club dance and is encouraged by their dancer friends to continue learning to call. The new caller does not yet have a complete idea of the complexity of calling and needs guidance. As a Mentor, you can provide that help, but may yourself want some guidance. CALLERLAB’s Caller Training Committee hopes that you will be able to use this booklet as a framework.

First, if a new caller has successfully performed one or more singing calls, they should be encouraged to understand the complexities of learning more about calling. A recommended step would be to have the new caller buy the Starter Kit which is available from CALLERLAB at a cost of $25. This kit includes names and pictograms of formations, names and pictograms of arrangements, some definitions of common terms used by callers, the Standard Basic and Mainstreams Handbook, and copies of the call definitions. The information in this kit gives a new caller a sense of how complex calling can be. This kit is an excellent reference tool. You, as a Mentor, will be the person who can help the new caller use this tool.

Each section of this “Mentor’s Guide” talks about important skills or knowledge that a caller should have. There are also homework sheets and suggested exercises that the mentor caller can use to help the new caller.

CALLERLAB’s Caller Training Committee has tried to put the sections in a logical progression, but you may want to vary your approach. The order is not set in stone to be followed exactly. It is designed to be delivered at your discretion so that the student caller can build upon a foundation of knowledge and skills. The student
caller should not rush through the sections, but should take the time to master the skills in each chapter. The mentor needs to be able to advise the student caller that he/she needs more practice in a certain skill, and ask for completed homework that shows the skill is being mastered.

Calling is delivering commands to music with timing so that the dancers can move smoothly to the music and commands without stopping. Because music is so important, our first section is designed to introduce the student caller to music structure and help him/her deliver calls in a way that relates to the music.

Understanding the calls is mandatory to a caller’s delivery of smooth flowing patter. Too often a new caller wants to become a “sight caller” and rushes past needed skills to work on sight resolution. We, the committee members who are writing these guidelines, want to stress that without proper foundation knowledge of what the calls accomplish, a caller cannot become an effective “sight caller”.

Finally, please understand that members of the Caller Training Committee are interested in helping you to mentor a new caller. If you are confused by any of the content, please contact us through the CALLERLAB Home Office at 1-785-783-3665.

Thank you for becoming a Mentor.



Condensed Teaching Order

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Ad Hoc Committee
(prepared by Tim Marriner and Bill Harrison)
2013-04-01 (Press Release)
2014-12-01 (Full Document)

Press Release

Full Document

In 2012 CALLERLAB commissioned an Ad Hoc committee to work with ACA to document a condensed teaching system that some callers had been using successfully for some time. The Press Release document describes the project and presents the initial output of the Ad Hoc in April of 2013. Additional materials and documentation were developed by the CALLERLAB members and a detailed booklet was released in December of 2014. That booklet (access via the Full Document link) includes the suggested calls to teach along with abbreviated definitions, teaching tips and other useful information.

See document abstract for the Full Document below.

Several different approaches to teaching square dancing have surfaced over the years; Blast Classes, Fast Track, and ABC, to name a few. Most of these methods involve shorter teach times. All offer an alternative approach to teaching outside the norm. One problem not usually addressed is the staggering amount of material that still must be taught for the average new dancer to participate in a club program. Many groups start new dancer sessions once a year in Sept. and move them through for almost a full year before they can join in with the existing club. The window of opportunity to join Square Dancing is usually open and shut in just three weeks. Very difficult to get many new dancers involved this way at today’s current pace of life.

It is for this reason other teaching approaches have been introduced. Still, only a handful have had limited success with these unique teaching methods. One pitfall is not having a suitable destination for new dancers to continue after the session is over. The transition between class and club is still devastating with soaring dropout rates. It is unrealistic to assume a reversal of this trend can be obtained by teaching new recruits at a quicker pace with as much material currently being danced at average clubs.

Focus groups surveys concluded the average age of our activity is growing older. The same surveys polled ex-dancers and obtained staggering results that most felt were not statistically accurate. Yet several other focus groups netted the same results. Apparently, close to a million people have had an introduction to Modern Western Square Dancing but dropped out mostly because it took too long to learn. Shortening the lessons seems a logical repair, however; it is only one part of the equation. Less material needs to be offered while still providing variety and fun.

It has been suggested that a limited dance language can be obtained if a group committed itself to the current Basic Programs. It is debatable however why such a group is not sustainable in most regions. One possible answer is that there are several redundant dance moves and others that are not widely used on an average Mainstream floor. Also, dancer satisfaction can be better achieved with a wider variety of calls from a wider variety of formations better sustained with some Mainstream actions.

The ad hoc committee working on this project designed a teach order that includes these most popular dance actions, integrating some of the more difficult dance actions with the easier ones, and defers less used dance actions and redundancies to shorten the normal teach time. The following will provide greater explanation and details of this Condensed Teach Order.



Sight And Module Resolution Systems Document

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document CHOREOGRAPHIC APPLICATIONS COMMITTEE (CAC),
CALLER TRAINING COMMITTEE, and
CALLER COACH COMMITTEE
(edited by Dottie Welch)
2014-09-03 Full Document

This document is a compendium describing dozens of known systems for resolving squares, including both sight and module based approaches. The objective was to document as many systems as possible that are currently in use by experienced callers. Experienced callers can use it to discover different approaches that may help them add variety. Newer callers can use it to select a method that would work best for them as they are learning to resolve smoothly.

The goal of this project is to help callers improve their ability to present smooth and danceable choreography by increasing their knowledge of efficient and interesting resolution systems. The name “Sight and Module Resolution Systems” has been chosen to indicate that the focus is on resolution systems in which the caller first uses sight, or a combination of modules and sight, to move the dancers into a recognizable FASR and then uses one or more modules to resolve the square. Perhaps the FASR will be one where the square will be resolved by simply calling “Allemande Left”, “Right and Left Grand”, “Promenade”, or “Back Out At Home”. The intention is to document as many different systems as possible that proficient sight callers are using. We are interested in what sight callers are thinking and what their intermediate goals are as they resolve the square. The hope is that such documentation will help other callers become aware of the possibilities. Every attempt has been made to write explanations of the systems that can be understood by the average Basic or Mainstream caller. The choreographic examples are sorted by CALLERLAB program, and always begin with Basic calls. They also include examples using Mainstream, Plus, Advanced and Challenge calls. There is no intent to recommend one system over another. The aim is to increase understanding about what other callers are thinking. Brains work in different ways, so over the years callers have developed different systems for comprehending the patterns of square dancing. Hopefully, at least one of the systems documented here will be a natural fit to each caller’s individual reasoning style. Also there is a need for different systems, or adjustments within a system, to accommodate differences in the vocabulary of the dancers. Some attention is given to sight calling for the whole spectrum; from new dancers with a very limited vocabulary to Challenge dancers with an extensive vocabulary.

This is primarily a reference tool. All readers will need to be familiar with the terminology and skills discussed in the second and fourth chapters. Each of the systems discussed in the remaining chapters can be studied individually. Chapter 14 contains a huge supply of useful Get-Outs. The hope is that appropriate parts of the document will be read by new sight callers, somewhat experienced sight callers, proficient sight callers, and teachers of sight callers. The expectation is that readers will come with differing needs and will be looking for various degrees of complexity. Some will be looking for clear explanations of the “old ways” which they hear being used by many experienced callers. Others will come looking for new ideas. The knowledge that there are “new ways” or “other ways” of thinking about sight calling is the underlying motivation for compiling all of this information into one document.

Thanks go to all those who have contributed directly or indirectly to the information contained here. The development of sight calling has been a long and complex process extending back at least to the 1960s. These systems reflect innumerable hours of pawn pushing, a great many discussions between callers, and more than 50 years of wonderful dancing.


Collected Winning Ways Stories

Article Type Submitter Date Story Abstract
Winning Ways Story Various 2015-05-12

This document is a compendium of all submitted Winning Ways stories as of May 2015.

Winning Ways Story Compendium

In addition the following PDF document serves as an index or topic organizer for the story compendium. It can help you find stories that deal with particular subject matter.

Breakdown of Winning Ways Articles-1