Condensed Teaching Order

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Ad Hoc Committee
(prepared by Tim Marriner and Bill Harrison)
2013-04-01 (Press Release)
2014-12-01 (Full Document)

Press Release

Full Document

In 2012 CALLERLAB commissioned an Ad Hoc committee to work with ACA to document a condensed teaching system that some callers had been using successfully for some time. The Press Release document describes the project and presents the initial output of the Ad Hoc in April of 2013. Additional materials and documentation were developed by the CALLERLAB members and a detailed booklet was released in December of 2014. That booklet (access via the Full Document link) includes the suggested calls to teach along with abbreviated definitions, teaching tips and other useful information.

See document abstract for the Full Document below.

Several different approaches to teaching square dancing have surfaced over the years; Blast Classes, Fast Track, and ABC, to name a few. Most of these methods involve shorter teach times. All offer an alternative approach to teaching outside the norm. One problem not usually addressed is the staggering amount of material that still must be taught for the average new dancer to participate in a club program. Many groups start new dancer sessions once a year in Sept. and move them through for almost a full year before they can join in with the existing club. The window of opportunity to join Square Dancing is usually open and shut in just three weeks. Very difficult to get many new dancers involved this way at today’s current pace of life.

It is for this reason other teaching approaches have been introduced. Still, only a handful have had limited success with these unique teaching methods. One pitfall is not having a suitable destination for new dancers to continue after the session is over. The transition between class and club is still devastating with soaring dropout rates. It is unrealistic to assume a reversal of this trend can be obtained by teaching new recruits at a quicker pace with as much material currently being danced at average clubs.

Focus groups surveys concluded the average age of our activity is growing older. The same surveys polled ex-dancers and obtained staggering results that most felt were not statistically accurate. Yet several other focus groups netted the same results. Apparently, close to a million people have had an introduction to Modern Western Square Dancing but dropped out mostly because it took too long to learn. Shortening the lessons seems a logical repair, however; it is only one part of the equation. Less material needs to be offered while still providing variety and fun.

It has been suggested that a limited dance language can be obtained if a group committed itself to the current Basic Programs. It is debatable however why such a group is not sustainable in most regions. One possible answer is that there are several redundant dance moves and others that are not widely used on an average Mainstream floor. Also, dancer satisfaction can be better achieved with a wider variety of calls from a wider variety of formations better sustained with some Mainstream actions.

The ad hoc committee working on this project designed a teach order that includes these most popular dance actions, integrating some of the more difficult dance actions with the easier ones, and defers less used dance actions and redundancies to shorten the normal teach time. The following will provide greater explanation and details of this Condensed Teach Order.