Lloyd Shaw Foundation

Article Type Owner Links Description
Resource

Lloyd Shaw Foundation

Website

The Lloyd Shaw Foundation preserves and shares a diverse range of dance and music traditions with an inter-generational audience. We develop leadership in traditional dance and music forms, and sponsor events and scholarships to ensure their continuity. Through our archives housed at the University of Denver, and at our Dance Center in Albuquerque, NM, we retain important historical records that document the past and enable us to preserve the future of traditional American folk dance.


Sets In Order Archive

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document

Bob Osgood

1948-1985

SIO Archive Page

Click on the link to view a page pointing to digitized copies of complete editions of the Sets In Order magazine.

This page is a tribute to Bob and Becky Osgood. The Sets In Order magazines are one of their legacys that comprise in these pages the history of modern square dancing. Bob began publishing SIO in 1948 and the last issue was issued in December 1985, 444 issues.

This material is Copyright (C) by Bob Osgood, and his heirs and may not be reproduced in any form including digital transmission for commercial purposes. Short articles may be reprinted using credit: “Reprinted from [magazine] and magazine year and month. magazine should be replaced by the appropriate magazine name such as SQUARE DANCING Magazine, official magazine of The Sets in Order American Square Dance Society” or just “Sets In Order” for earlier issues. Please credit by-lined authors.


Using Hearing Assist System To Slave One Amp To Another

Article Type Submitter Date Links Description
Idea Wayne Weston (wtweston@satx.rr.com )

2017-04-08

Handout PDF

This handout from the CDLS session at the 2017 CALLERLAB convention explains how to slave one sound system to another using a hearing assist system. This avoids having to string long cables when sounding large rooms.


List of Sound Equipment For Square Dancing (CDLS 2017)

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document

Bob Riggs (Bob@SDE-Co.com)

2017-04-08

Equipment List PDF

This 2-page document lists some of the commonly used sound equipment used for square dancing and where it may be obtained. It is a handout from a presentation at the Community Dance Leaders Seminar (CDLS) at the 2017 CALLERLAB convention.


Managing Dances With SqView

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Barry Johnson (callerbear@gmail.com) 2010-04-01 Managing Dances with SqView PDF

This 27 page PDF document describes in detail how to install and use the SqView music management program on a laptop computer.

Document Abstract

Callers and cuers using laptop computers for their music will need to use some piece of software to play their music. There are a wide variety of choices for this software, and generally any will be sufficient for simply playing music. However, most dance leaders prefer to use software specifically designed for square and round dance leaders. One particular software program, SqView (pronounced “Square View”) has been growing in popularity, and is used by an estimated 75% of callers using computers. This paper discusses SqView – how to get it, how to use it, and how to fix some common problems you may encounter with the program.


CALLERLAB Program Documents

Article Type Author Last Update Description
Summary Barry Clasper (barry@clasper.ca) 2017-03-16

This summary points to all the program-related documents that have been officially published by CALLERLAB. This includes program lists, call definitions, timing charts, lesson checklists, teaching tips, and other materials. Click on the appropriate button below to see a list of materials for the program indicated. Click on the name of the document to access it.

Program Document Tables (click to view)

Document Name Revision Date
Advanced List 2016-12-21
Advanced Definitions 2017-02-22
A1 Checklist 2016-12-21
A2 Checklist 2012-09-13
Advanced Timing Chart 2015-12-15
What Is Advanced Dancing Booklet ????

Document Name Revision Date
C1 List 2016-09-26
C1 Definitions 2017-03-19
C2 List 2016-12-21
C2 Definitions 2016-12-21
C3A List 2014-02-04
C3A Definitions (obsolete, new doc under construction) 2008-06-30
Challenge Teaching Orders 2012-02-10


Nuts And Bolts (book)

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Kip Garvey (kip@kipgarvey.com) 5 March, 2017 Book

This 190 page book by one of the legendary figures in MWSD presents an analysis of choreographic structure for modern western square dance callers and dancers. With over 50 years experience as a professional square dance caller, Kip presents the principles of calling current day square dance for readers interested in understanding underlying concepts and technique with emphasis on the technical aspects of choreography. This deep dive into choreographic theory is loaded with graphic illustrations and many Getout, Conversion and Transition call modules. It is a text that should be in every caller’s library.

Click on the “Book” link to the left to see more information and purchase online.


Standard Contract for a Calling Date

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document CALLERLAB 24 May 2009 Contract PDF

This PDF file contains a boilerplate standard contract you can use when arranging a calling date.


Stages Document from Women In Calling Committee

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Women In Calling Committee of CALLERLAB, Deborah Carroll-Jones Chairperson July, 2008 “Stages” Document

This document was produced by the Women In Calling Committee to assist and inform women callers regarding issues that are unique to women callers.


Enticing New Callers

Article Type Submitter Date Story Abstract
Winning Ways Story Arlene Kaspik (amkaspik@comcast.net), Janice Cha (Janice.cha@sbcglobal.net) July 30, 2016

Here is a report from Arlene M. Kaspik about the New Callers Seminar that took place during the ILLINOIS SD CONVENTION, July 30, 2016, in Itasca. We are so incredibly thrilled by the potential new callers in our midst. Way to go, Arlene! – Janice (Illinois 2016 SD Convention co-chair). You can read the full report below.

Several callers asked me to provide a follow-up report on the new callers seminar held just prior to the Illinois State Square Dance Convention. Here it is!

For the past few years Barry Johnson and I hosted a 1 hour or 90 minute session/chat “So You Think You Might Want to Become a Caller” as part of the Illinois State Convention. We had a dream of expanding it in to a seminar that included microphone time as well as just talking about what it takes to become a caller and opportunities for caller schools. It is our belief that for the activity to continue we not only need new dancers, we need new callers as well. This year that dream became a reality.

We had absolutely no budget for the event. The room(s) were included in the convention committee’s negotiations. Other than that, the panelists donated their time and I donated the cost of reproducing a packet of information for the participants. The packet included a list of “full-fledged caller schools coming up in the next couple of months, information on formation and arrangements, basic information on CRAMS, how to find and purchase square dance music, and the usual materials found in a beginner’s packet.

Presenters were all Illinois callers who donated their time: Bob Asp, Curt Braffet, Barry Johnson and Ozzie Pearl. Our goal was to reach out to really new callers and talented dancers that we tho ugh might make good callers. Janice Cha and Bobby Poyner helped a great deal with publicity. Word of mouth and personal invitation were al so tactics in attracting attendees. I had hoped for 6 potential new callers – maybe 8. By the time convention rolled around we had 18 participants and about 75% of them had never picked up a microphone before. Exactly the audience we had hoped for and larger than I imagined in my wildest dreams.

In the morning and, for a short time after lunch, there were presentations on software and technology, music, showmanship and an introduction to choreography and resolving a square from a corner box. The bulk of the afternoon provided each participant with the opportunity to pick up a microphone, move dancers around and resolve a square. About 10 days prior to convention I received a phone call from the convention chair asking me if I was open to the idea of a “new callers open mic” from 10 until 11 am on Sunday morning. I eagerly agreed to promote the concept at the seminar. I had hoped that 5 or 6 of the attendees would sign up for a slot and I made the assumption that the presenters and I could fill in any holes in the schedule. Eleven freshly minted callers signed up to call on Sunday morning and they called to a packed room. As a matter of fact, other rooms on the same floor of the hotel came to the open mic room to steal dancers for their floor. Passers by would hear the joy and enthusiasm and poke their heads in to see what was happening. Most of them stayed to dance a bit.

Even though the information packet had some short, easy sequences for the new callers to use, they all wrote their own choreography and used it with a high success rate. Some chose to track me down to read through their choreography but most of them did not. AND they were amazing!

I could not have been more pleased with the outcome of this one-day seminar. It did exactly what we hoped it would do: Give potential new callers a taste of what it’s like to call. The workshop also attracted exactly the type of person we were hoping to reach. OK, 1 or 2 were a more seasoned but most of them were truly first time callers.

At the Illinois Callers’ Association meeting on Sunday morning, the group began a discussion of “where do we go from here” and “how do we build on this success.” Several callers agreed to mentor the attendees in their area. We are also looking at expanding this concept in 2018. More on that as it unfolds!



Beginner Dance Party Leaders Seminar – Presentations from 2014

Article Type Author Last Update Description
Summary

Presentation

Barry Clasper (barry@clasper.ca) January 2016

For many years, as a lead-in to the main convention, CALLERLAB has hosted a 1-1/2 day seminar focusing on how to call square dance parties for non-dancers. CALLERLAB has posted to YouTube videos of a number of the presentations from the 2014 BDPLS. These presentations constitute a wealth of information about how to make such events a success. They cover everything from dance material to promotion to preparations to contracts, and much more.

Presenter Topic and Link
Dottie Welch Variations on the Virginia Reel
Susan Morris Effective Use of Circles
Paul Moore Working With Kids
Bob Riggs Planning
Chris Pinkham Dance Programs
Cal Campbell Genderless Dancing


What Did You Say?

Article Type Event Date Presenter Links Description
Presentation CALLERLAB Convention 2014 Susan Healey Video File

As square dance callers, we communicate with dancers using several mediums, but primarily auditory. Dancers react to our verbal commands. Due to the increasing age of dancers, statistics indicate that a large percentage of them more than likely have a significant hearing impairment, even if they do not wear hearing aids. Learn why people can “hear, but not understand”; the effects of background noise on comprehension; why people prefer different levels of loudness and louder isn’t always better; whether or not hearing aids help, and more. Improve your calling by learning techniques to help all dancers hear and understand you better. Susan is a Clinical Audiologist with over 30 years of experience.


Introduction To Mental Image Choreography

Article Type Event Date Presenter Links Description
Presentation CALLERLAB Convention 2013 Don Beck Video File

Handout PDF

Don Beck provides an introduction to his mental image choreography system to the Caller Coach committee at the 2013 CALLERLAB Convention. It provides a quick overview of how the system works and illustrates some of its power. If you’re interested in learning to use this system, you can find information about Don’s book “Out Of Sight” here.


Controlling Choreography With Relationships

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Barry Johnson (callerbear@gmail.com) 2014 Controlling Choreography With Relationships (PDF File)

This 78 page document is a detailed description of how callers can use dancer relationships as a tool for resolving squares. See the document abstract below for additional details.

From a choreographic point of view,callers describe the position of the dancers in a square by using four descriptive attributes: Formation, Arrangement, Sequence and Relationships.

  • Formation describes the spots on the floor in which dancers are standing,
  • Arrangement describes the way dancing genders are standing relative to one another,
  • Sequence describes whether or not dancers are in the original squared set order, and
  • Relationship describes which men and which women are near one another.

Together, these four attributes can be used to precisely define the choreographic state of a square, and a specific combination of these four values is called a “FASR” (pronounced “fah-zer”).

For decades, many callers have focused on Formation, Arrangement and Sequence while tracking dancers as they move through a sequence. Although formation and arrangement are fairly easy to see, sequence is not — especially “on the fly” since many calls will change the sequence of some or all dancers. There are specific techniques that can be used to resolve a square using just formation, arrangement and sequence, but these techniques may require several steps to reach the final desired result. The complexity of those techniques leads many callers to “hunt for corners”, trying one call after another until the dancers fall into a recognizable FASR.

With this focus on Formation, Arrangement and Sequence the fourth leg of the nomenclature system, Relationship, has generally been ignored.

But it turns out that the relationships of the dancers can actually be easier for many callers to understand and see while a square is in motion, and the principles of using relationships while calling can be learned in just a few minutes. Once relationships are recognizable, the state of the square is easily identified in almost any FASR at all. A few simple “cookbook” rules allow a caller to consciously change the relationships at will, giving the caller a great deal of control over the state of the square.

There are three main ways that callers can use relationships:

  • Finding their way out when they’re lost: being able to recognize the state of the square, then regaining control by consciously changing stations;
  • As a framework within which modules and desired choreographic sequences can be used. Put the dancers into a known station, dance them around as desired while preserving the station (or consciously changing it to a different one), and finally resolve without question because you know exactly where the dancers are.
  • As a launching pad for using memorized get-outs from many different starting positions.

We’ll discuss each of these areas in the pages that follow.

Relationships and CRaMS
For the last several years, some callers have been advocating a larger calling system named CRaMS, the “Controlled Relationship and Manipulation System.” Readers that are familiar with CRaMS will recognize much of the material in this book. CRaMS uses relationship choreographic control as just one of several tools and techniques to achieve the broader goal of helping callers to improve upon their craft. We’ll talk more about the larger system of CRaMS in Chapters 7 and 17.

Relationships and Mental Image
Astute readers may also notice several similarities to Don Beck’s Mental Image system, particularly in the way that calls are classified based on the way they affect the setup of the square. Both systems (Relationships and Mental Image) rely on the symmetries of the square as calls are executed — and therefore are likely to resemble one another, even while coming at the problem from very different directions and using completely different vocabularies.



All About Modules (book)

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document

Resource

Cal Campbell (cal@eazy.net) 2014 Book

This book covers all the bases starting with the new caller just learning how to call and on through the old hands looking for ways to expand their collection of modules and to learn new tricks on how to use square dance modules to improve their calling skills. It’s all there.

The new caller will find a comprehensive set of lessons to introduce them to the art of using modules to call square dances. You will be guided step by step through a learning process that will enable you to quickly select and memorize modules and then call them at a dance and be successful. It is a time proven successful way to learn how to call and to entertain square dancers. However, It’s not a magic. You will have to practice and you will have to study choreography.


Teaching New Dancers (eBook)

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Cal Campbell (calcampbl@gmail.com) 2015 eBook

Designed for Elementary and Secondary School Teachers.

The 18 dances featured in this short book use only four basics. Circle Right/Left, Forward & Back, Arm Turns, Star Right/Left. These four basics are used in big circles, line dances, contra dance, square dances, trios, and mixers. This enables the teacher to teach only four dance movement and then to use these same movements in various ways to provide a great deal of variety in dances.


dosado.com

Article Type Owner Links Description
Resource Paul Cote (paul@hiltonaudio.com) Website

Dosado.com has a long and varied history. It has served as the URL for a series of square dance music services: Supreme Audio, then Palomino, and most recently it was purchased by Hilton Audio (Paul Cote). It contains a huge collection of the offerings of many of the square dance music producers and permits online purchase and download. The site also has a number of very useful sections, for example music for special occasions or themes such as Valentine’s Day, Christmas, or St. Patrick’s. You can find music by title, label, or artist. They also sell equipment such as speakers, microphones, and hearing enhancement systems.


musicforcallers.com

Article Type Owner Links Description
Resource CALLERLAB Music Producers Committee Website

Most of the producers of Square Dance Music have joined together to provide this combined website for music specifically produced for use in square dancing. It is an all-inclusive site that includes most of the labels in operation today. There are links to the sites of individual producers. There is also a search function that allows you to search for specific music by title, caller, or original artist, as well as pull up a list of the most recent releases. In most cases listening samples of the music are provided.


Out Of Sight (book)

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document Don Beck 2014 Book

Out of Sight is a book that teaches square dance callers how to manage choreography using a mental image system. Other common choreographic methods are reading, modules, and sight calling. Mental image calling allows a caller to create choreography on the fly, while calling, and then easily resolve the square. Unlike reading or modules, the choreography need not be pre-written, and allows the caller much more flexibility to improvise. Unlike sight calling, the caller does not have to memorize who started with whom, each tip, and s/he is not dependent on whether the dancers made any mistakes. This method does not require that a caller learn how to follow eight or even only four dancers, but basically only one dancer as s/he moves around the square.

The Second Printing is now available. It includes an additional 15 pages in the form of a Forward to the Second Printing, an Afterword, and an additional Appendix. There is additional advanced information about the system available on the authors website for callers who have fully learned the system as taught in the book.


Tim Marriner’s Caller Education Page

Article Type Owner Links Description
Resource Tim Marriner Website

Tim Marriner was a CALLERLAB Accredited Caller Coach who created and published a large quantity of caller educational material over the years. Tim generously made this wealth of informative articles available for free download in PDF format. Sadly, Tim died suddenly in 2016, depriving square dancing of one of its most knowledgeable and articulate advocates.


Taminations

Article Type Owner Links Description
Resource Brad Christie (brad@bradchristie.com) Website

This site contains a tool that allows viewers to watch an animation of a call being performed, often from a variety of starting formations. It provides an excellent educational tool to assist both dancers and callers in understanding the action of calls. It covers calls for programs from Basic to C3B. A mobile version of the tool is also available that can be operated offline on an Android or iPhone device.


CALLERLAB Community Dance Resources

Article Type Owner Links Description
Resource Dottie Welch Website

This Dance Resource is a compilation of Beginner Party Dances, Community Dances, Contra Dances, and Traditional Square Dances. Dances are grouped by type and listed in HTML code for easy viewing. Each dance is also available to be downloaded as either a Rich Text File or a .pdf file. There are also supporting documents including a Glossary of Calls and Formation Diagrams.


ceder.net

Article Type Owner Links Description
Resource Vic & Debbie Ceder (debbie@ceder.net) Website

Ceder.net is a comprehensive collection of resources related to square dancing. It includes a number of sections:

  • A database of callers and cuers
  • A database of square dance clubs
  • An extensive database of choreography examples
  • A database containing upcoming events
  • (for the above 4 databases individuals can input and update their own entries to keep them current)

  • A large repository of documents and articles related to square dancing
  • A huge database of square dance music (for historical reference, not for purchase)
  • Links and lists of other square dance resources


2017 Caller Schools

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document CALLERLAB Home Office 2017-03-15 List of 2017 Schools

This document contains a listing of Caller Schools sponsored and staffed by CALLERLAB members for 2017. This listing is provided as a service to CALLERLAB members for information. This listing does not constitute endorsement of the listed schools in preference to any that may not be listed. Only schools that are reported to us are listed. For further information, please contact the school of your choice.


Caller Mentoring Guidelines

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document CALLERLAB Caller Training Committee (callertraining@callerlab.org) 2013-01-06 Full Document

This document was prepared by the Caller Training Committee to assist those callers who are mentoring newer callers. (See document abstract below)

If you are thinking of becoming a Mentor for a new caller, this booklet is designed to help a more experienced caller to work with a new caller. If a friend wants to learn to call, the experienced caller can just give them a record and help them learn a singing call. However, callers know that there is more to calling than memorizing a singing call. If the experienced caller wants to really help, they need to become a Mentor. This booklet will provide ideas for being a Mentor to a new caller. The committee expects that the Mentor will work with the student caller for a period of time that can be up to two years. The new caller would become more independent over that time, but could consult with the Mentor when needed.

A potential caller may get started by trying a singing call at an amateur night, by teaching square dancing in combination with called recordings, or by developing an interest in choreography. Most often the new/potential caller sings a singing call at a club dance and is encouraged by their dancer friends to continue learning to call. The new caller does not yet have a complete idea of the complexity of calling and needs guidance. As a Mentor, you can provide that help, but may yourself want some guidance. CALLERLAB’s Caller Training Committee hopes that you will be able to use this booklet as a framework.

First, if a new caller has successfully performed one or more singing calls, they should be encouraged to understand the complexities of learning more about calling. A recommended step would be to have the new caller buy the Starter Kit which is available from CALLERLAB at a cost of $25. This kit includes names and pictograms of formations, names and pictograms of arrangements, some definitions of common terms used by callers, the Standard Basic and Mainstreams Handbook, and copies of the call definitions. The information in this kit gives a new caller a sense of how complex calling can be. This kit is an excellent reference tool. You, as a Mentor, will be the person who can help the new caller use this tool.

Each section of this “Mentor’s Guide” talks about important skills or knowledge that a caller should have. There are also homework sheets and suggested exercises that the mentor caller can use to help the new caller.

CALLERLAB’s Caller Training Committee has tried to put the sections in a logical progression, but you may want to vary your approach. The order is not set in stone to be followed exactly. It is designed to be delivered at your discretion so that the student caller can build upon a foundation of knowledge and skills. The student
caller should not rush through the sections, but should take the time to master the skills in each chapter. The mentor needs to be able to advise the student caller that he/she needs more practice in a certain skill, and ask for completed homework that shows the skill is being mastered.

Calling is delivering commands to music with timing so that the dancers can move smoothly to the music and commands without stopping. Because music is so important, our first section is designed to introduce the student caller to music structure and help him/her deliver calls in a way that relates to the music.

Understanding the calls is mandatory to a caller’s delivery of smooth flowing patter. Too often a new caller wants to become a “sight caller” and rushes past needed skills to work on sight resolution. We, the committee members who are writing these guidelines, want to stress that without proper foundation knowledge of what the calls accomplish, a caller cannot become an effective “sight caller”.

Finally, please understand that members of the Caller Training Committee are interested in helping you to mentor a new caller. If you are confused by any of the content, please contact us through the CALLERLAB Home Office at 1-785-783-3665.

Thank you for becoming a Mentor.



Sight And Module Resolution Systems Document

Article Type Author Publication Date Links Description
Document CHOREOGRAPHIC APPLICATIONS COMMITTEE (CAC),
CALLER TRAINING COMMITTEE, and
CALLER COACH COMMITTEE
(edited by Dottie Welch)
2014-09-03 Full Document

This document is a compendium describing dozens of known systems for resolving squares, including both sight and module based approaches. The objective was to document as many systems as possible that are currently in use by experienced callers. Experienced callers can use it to discover different approaches that may help them add variety. Newer callers can use it to select a method that would work best for them as they are learning to resolve smoothly.

The goal of this project is to help callers improve their ability to present smooth and danceable choreography by increasing their knowledge of efficient and interesting resolution systems. The name “Sight and Module Resolution Systems” has been chosen to indicate that the focus is on resolution systems in which the caller first uses sight, or a combination of modules and sight, to move the dancers into a recognizable FASR and then uses one or more modules to resolve the square. Perhaps the FASR will be one where the square will be resolved by simply calling “Allemande Left”, “Right and Left Grand”, “Promenade”, or “Back Out At Home”. The intention is to document as many different systems as possible that proficient sight callers are using. We are interested in what sight callers are thinking and what their intermediate goals are as they resolve the square. The hope is that such documentation will help other callers become aware of the possibilities. Every attempt has been made to write explanations of the systems that can be understood by the average Basic or Mainstream caller. The choreographic examples are sorted by CALLERLAB program, and always begin with Basic calls. They also include examples using Mainstream, Plus, Advanced and Challenge calls. There is no intent to recommend one system over another. The aim is to increase understanding about what other callers are thinking. Brains work in different ways, so over the years callers have developed different systems for comprehending the patterns of square dancing. Hopefully, at least one of the systems documented here will be a natural fit to each caller’s individual reasoning style. Also there is a need for different systems, or adjustments within a system, to accommodate differences in the vocabulary of the dancers. Some attention is given to sight calling for the whole spectrum; from new dancers with a very limited vocabulary to Challenge dancers with an extensive vocabulary.

This is primarily a reference tool. All readers will need to be familiar with the terminology and skills discussed in the second and fourth chapters. Each of the systems discussed in the remaining chapters can be studied individually. Chapter 14 contains a huge supply of useful Get-Outs. The hope is that appropriate parts of the document will be read by new sight callers, somewhat experienced sight callers, proficient sight callers, and teachers of sight callers. The expectation is that readers will come with differing needs and will be looking for various degrees of complexity. Some will be looking for clear explanations of the “old ways” which they hear being used by many experienced callers. Others will come looking for new ideas. The knowledge that there are “new ways” or “other ways” of thinking about sight calling is the underlying motivation for compiling all of this information into one document.

Thanks go to all those who have contributed directly or indirectly to the information contained here. The development of sight calling has been a long and complex process extending back at least to the 1960s. These systems reflect innumerable hours of pawn pushing, a great many discussions between callers, and more than 50 years of wonderful dancing.


CALLERLAB 2015 Brainstorming Session

Article Type Submitter Date Links Description
Idea Barry Clasper (barry@clasper.ca) 2015-07-12 Brainstorming Ideas Spreadsheet (CALLERLAB 2015)

A “brainstorming” session was held during the opening session of the CALLERLAB Convention in 2015. The audience was seated at round tables with 8-10 people at a table. Each table was asked to brainstorm for 10 minutes or so on things that could be done to “improve square dancing” (however they conceived of that). Ideas were just written down by each individual as fast as they occurred to them. Each table was asked to rank their ideas and select the top 3. Then those 3 were taken to another table, which was asked to rank them.

The attached Excel spreadsheet contains those ideas. There are 441 items of information. Some are cryptic or unformed, some are well-trodden ground, but many are valuable.

The spreadsheet has three columns for categorizing the idea so you can sort the spreadsheet and group ideas together by category. There are also two rank columns: the first shows the rank assigned by the originating table, the second the rank assigned by the evaluating table. If the rank fields are blank, then the idea was not selected as one of the top 3 by the originating table.


Extended But Not Extreme – Plus

Article Type Event Date Presenter Links Description
Presentation CALLERLAB Convention 2015 Barry Clasper, John Marshall Extended But Not Extreme – Plus (Clasper Handout)

There are many calls for which we have well known “standard” applications, and we have even documented many of them in the Standard Applications documents. “Standard”, however, does not mean “easier” — it really means “more common”. There are many infrequently used applications that are not hard, they’re just infrequent. Because they’re infrequent, dancers bobble when they hear them, so we avoid them, so they stay infrequent: vicious circle. Some examples: Peel The Top from LH Cols; Cut/Flip The Diamond, Girls as Centers; Ping Pong Circulate with same-sexes in center wave. If you are interested in enriching your dancers’ experience with usages that are not hard, just infrequently used, this session is for you.


What Is CALLERLAB?

Article Type Event Date Presenter Links Description
Presentation CALLERLAB Convention 2013 Pam Clasper Handout PDF

Handout provided by Pam Clasper for the Orientation session at CALLERLAB 2013. It describes the purpose of the CALLERLAB organization and the benefits of being a member.


Caller Drill Program

Article Type Submitter Date Links Description
Idea Barry Clasper (barry@clasper.ca) 2015-05-29 Callarama Program

One of the most difficult parts of learning to call is finding opportunities to practice with live dancers. Today’s computer technologies could compensate for some of that by providing a program to drill callers that are in the process of learning choreographic techniques that require them to quickly see patterns and make decisions about how to manipulate the square. The most obvious use would be to practice sight resolution techniques, but there are lots of others. Callarama is a program which accepts voice command input and executes the call with a display of animated dancers. As it exists today it is too slow to serve as a drill program, but (presumably) it could be tweaked to allow for that use. Perhaps CALLERLAB could approach the owner and offer to fund a specialized version of the program aimed at caller training.


Amateur Caller Night

Article Type Submitter Date Links Description
Idea Mike Callahan 2015-03-29 (none)

Recruiting new callers: Once a year in our area, a club in our area has an “amateur callers night”. It is announced a few months in advance. Criteria is that you are interested in calling and/or you have never been paid to call a dance. I personally know of 4 people who have become callers from this event.


Large Event Planning

Article Type Event Date Presenter Links Description
Presentation CALLERLAB Convention March 2014 Lee & Barbi Ashwill, Walt Burr, Dottie Welch Audio Recording

Ashwill Handout

Burr Handout

Welch Handout

This presentation session covered how to plan for events that are larger than a standard club dance, either in duration or number of dancers. This could range anywhere from a special club dance where other clubs are invited to attend, all the way to a major convention spanning several days and employing multiple callers in multiple halls.


Finding Music

Article Type Author Last Update Description
Summary Barry Clasper 2015-11-12

This article aggregates a number of sources for obtaining music suitable for square dancing. It includes both music specially produced for square dancing and also sources of alternative music.

Modern Western Square Dancing primarily uses recorded music. There are a number of square dance music producers that produce music specially designed for square dance use. This is often referred to just as “square dance music”. There is also lots of music available that is suitable for square dance use despite not being produced with that in mind. This is termed “alternative music”.

Music From Square Dance Music Producers
  • MusicForCallers An aggregate webpage containing links to the websites of many square dance music producers
  • dosado.com Square dance music distribution service offering music from many producers
  • A & S Records Distributors of a number of square dance music labels
  • Perry’s Place Kentucky-based music and apparel store
Sources Of Alternative Music